CBC, in True Pravda Fashion, Omits Gas Plant Conviction on Friday’s ‘The National,’ But Has Time to Look Back at Host’s Archive Footage and for Trump, Trump, Trump

The state broadcaster is at it again with it’s disgraceful propaganda. CBC’s “The National” — pathetically in third place in the TV ratings for a Canadian nightly news broadcast, despite being given a $1.2 billion advantage over its competitors courtesy of taxpayers — disgustingly neglected to report on the conviction of former Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty’s chief of staff on Friday.

(The only time Wynne and the OLP seem to make the CBC’s nightly news is when they’re championing some socialist agenda like the minimum wage or their aides are acquitted on charges.)

It’s not every day a former premier’s top aide is criminally convicted over the deletion of public records revealing the Ontario Liberal Party canceled two gas plants, estimated to cost upwards of $1.1 billion overall to taxpayers, all in the self-interest of saving a few Liberal seats. But the CBC doesn’t have time for THAT! No, Friday was such a wild news day that they just couldn’t possibly fit a report on something that is so like 2012 news. Not that the OLP’s gas plant scandal was ever considered much of a story even then by the CBC. No, you see, Liberals can burn money with impunity as far as CBC is concerned, just so long as CBC is still overfed at the taxpayer trough. CBC, back around the same time as the gas plant scandal, instead focused on Nigel Wright cutting a $90,000 check for Senator Mike Duffy so he would pay back taxpayers for sketchy expense claimes. The only time CBC suddenly cares about Canadians money being blown is when a Conservative is caught, like Bev Oda and the infamous $16 glass of OJ. CBC really couldn’t care less about taxpayer money being wasted and the crippling debt that’s being incurred and the billions wasted in servicing the debt. They only feign outrage over wasted taxpayer money when Conservatives are in power and are the culprits because they know conservative voters don’t like to tolerate waste.

How else can you explain the CBC’s “The National” ignoring the verdict in the gas plant scandal, which, again, cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars?

Oh, sorry, I forgot, it was because Friday was an insane news day.

CBC needed to spend five minutes on Dear Leader at a reserve still in dire straights despite his by and large empty promises in the last two years. If CBC really cared about the welfare of people on the reserves they would still be hounding Trudeau over scrapping financial transparency of the chiefs and reserve band councils. But no, everything is all about keeping up appearances for the CBC. How else could you explain CBC turning a Gucci-sunglass-wearing, luxury SUV-driving  Chief Theresa Spence, whose people were homeless while she lined her and her boyfriend’s own pockets, into the next Mahatma Gandhi?

CBC also needed to spend nine minutes on a feature of two American women’s opinions on Trump’s first year. Yes, a whole nine minutes was needed for this, including a 15-second pause when one woman tries to think of one thing Trump did that was good. Groundbreaking journalism to be sure.

CBC just couldn’t afford to spare any time from a story on an Olympic speed skating coach that had alleged sexual relationships with American speed skaters in the past when he worked for the US team. Still waiting for CBC to address similar allegations made against CBC idol Peter Mansbridge.

CBC needed another four-and-a-half minutes were need to talk about the US government shutdown, as if this doesn’t ever happen or is affecting Canadians. Of course the CBC had nothing, even on its website, about the story blowing up late Thursday night on a classified memo, which Republicans in Washington are demanding be released to the public, allegedly showing the FISA warrants to spy on the Trump campaign were made on the “unverified” and dubious Trump dossier, which looks like collusion of top officials at the Obama Department of Justice, CIA and within the Obama administration itself to help the Clinton campaign and intervene the election process. Forget all the trumped up charges over the Trump campaign’s collusion with the Russians, the real smoking guns in apparent election meddling are in the Democrats’ hands. Not according to the CBC though.

CBC spent another four-and-a-half minutes on the alleged Toronto serial killer, yet somehow totally missed the revelation that Bruce McArthur was connected on social media with several of the men who disappeared in the gay village in the past seven years. Sloppy journalism to be sure.

CBC also spent five-minutes on the acquittal of three train workers in the Lac-Mégantic disaster. An important story for sure, but you’d think they could’ve reported it in three minutes and spent two minutes on the conviction at the gas plant trial?

Finally, “The National” also needed to include an airplane landing in strong winds, a bear eating cake, more union-organized Tim Hortons protests inflamed by the CBC a couple weeks ago with selective reporting and two minutes spent between the three hosts — Rosemary Barton, Adrienne Arsenault and Ian Hanomansing — discussing archive footage of Hanomansing back in the eighties.

Here’s a reminder of how CBC hammered Bev Oda over her “extravagant expenses” on a trip. Where was CBC’s “The National”‘s report on the news Friday (although admittedly first reported by the CBC, but not given prominence or making the flagship program) that the Health Minister’s Twitter account costs $100,000 per year to run? There could be countless stories on extravagant spending from this drunk-on-spending and big deficit Trudeau government.

Sadly the average Canadian still thinks CBC is a trusted news source they want to see get $1.2 billion from the federal government. This needs to change. The state broadcaster does not have the interest of properly informing Canadians on the shenanigans our politicians are up to, but instead feeds citizens carefully-selected pablum and agitprop, focusing on emotions and feelings instead facts and finances, that confirm their institutionalized socialist biases. May the CBC’s “The National”‘s ratings continue to tank.

Advertisements

CBC’s The National Reminisces about Justin Trudeau’s Victory while reporting on Bronfman Tax Haven (Nov. 5, 2017)

(What Was Wrong With CBC’s The National Mission Statement.)

Time allotment for The National stories on Sunday:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vR97AXIXa6sodK8DYbbWpnn6iFD_Jm6VrHgIupdeZiWgvQOXgUgpeIWYvC_V9Qrzo-YuK6Boxolazpq/pubchart?oid=1966259362&format=interactive

 

Last night’s The National was the last show in the old format, and you can’t say they didn’t go out with a bang in having a blockbuster news day.

The lead story was the horrific massacre in Texas. The story was well done and very informative for how little time they had to prepare the story. (Have to give credit where credit is due.) I don’t really want to discuss this horrible tragedy anymore than that for now.

The National then moved on to the main event, the Paradise Papers that they–in tandem with journalists from around the world–had been working on for months. The CBC spent 29 minutes on the Bronfmans and Koblers apparent offshore trust and their connection to the Liberal Party of Canada and PM Justin Trudeau. Here’s The Toronto Star piece in case you missed it. (The Star report, although very thorough, conveniently left out the bombshell factoid that the Bronfman family apparently pressured the CRA into letting them move $2 billion of their family fortune out of Canada tax-free. Kudos to The National for bringing it up.) I’d say most of this reporting was fair, however, The National broke up the reporting on the Canadian angle to the Paradise Papers into two parts, with the first part as a four-minute news report and analysis, then reports on Trump’s top advisor’ and the Queen’s connections to the tax haven followed before the latter 25-minute feature story on the Bronfmans and Koblers (worth watching) was aired.

The National‘s initial report was adequate. They even gave opposition MPs, including Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, time to speak about the revelation. The only problem I had was how the CBC didn’t go deeper into Trudeau’s relationship with Bronfman. It seems the CBC is pinning all of this on the Bronfmans and their associates instead of focusing on how Trudeau and his father play a role in this. What’s more interesting is how the reporting on Trudeau was juxtaposed with the reporting on Trump and his connection to his top adviser. In that three-minute report the CBC went for the jugular in tying Trump to billionaire Wilbur Ross. In the 25-minute in-depth feature about the Bronfmans and their tax avoidance Trudeau is only presented at the start of the report where they show about a minute of him on the campaign trail gladhanding with supporters and telling adoring Liberal crowds sweet nothings. Very little is mentioned after that about Trudeau’s personal relationship and friendship to Stephen Bronfman. The way CBC presented the story–through images anyway–made it appear as if a smiling and loved-by-everyone Trudeau just met this Bronfman bloke on the campaign trails. Here’s a bunch of the cheery images of Trudeau in the extended segment talking about the supposed heyday of Trudeau mania 2.0 (even though he won only 0.1 per cent more than Harper did in the popular vote). CBC was sure feeling nostalgia for sunnier days.

2b5427ed-a6c5-478a-83d7-30f2b1f76cdd

3ea8bbe7-0171-40aa-ad7e-9056e0f0a047

5f94bfd8-d936-43a9-84c8-980729966b95

25067b03-250f-4419-8d0c-89f10f3eb401

8f43df01-1011-4b20-91f8-5ed781c4bdb5

25bec48c-17e1-4a77-8771-c5a326f42f23

30db2687-2f4e-4259-982c-ab2c942de264

70a5ceb0-98c7-44d3-ae4a-62c213073309

aecf0c57-d4fb-49a2-8674-f4b7fd0a519f

bc080ade-4f43-468e-9ffb-f722bd596107

c280444c-4404-4e88-9334-ef931ffaf883

e573983b-2814-47dd-9811-2e7fb792e7bf

eec892e2-8995-45a4-92c0-8aeb05ffefe6

f467997c-3093-49bf-9644-e925ec4fb077

fcd78054-41d4-4121-9e59-91854e6810b9

7850015f-1f55-49f9-82fa-269c21825584

7cdb6a1c-4f58-4e95-aeed-b7ae9036aee1

Now compare that to the images of Trump in the report about his business associates ties to the Paradise Papers.

f60ea525-ffac-4d17-b503-c7a8c38310a2

7124264b-885e-479c-95a6-d79788b5e0d9

f16d897d-d57e-4d47-bfa7-4cadc7a4f7bc

When the two stories are juxtaposed its as if Trudeau has just been unwittingly brought down by an acquaintance while the ominous U.S. report suggest Trump is linked to billionaire Wilbur Ross’ company’s ties to Russia, too. It’s also interesting that the CBC did not do a similar web of faces of the two generations of Bronfmans, Kolbers, and Trudeaus all closely tied. Below I provided a transcript of the Trump report and then the introduction to the feature on the Bronfmans, the part that talks about Trudeau, so you can see the contrast for yourself.

Heather Hiscox: The more than thirteen-million records in this leak also reveal secrets in Washington, including a top member of Donald Trump’s cabinet. Wilbur Ross is Commerce Secretary. But his deep ties to Trump, and as these documents suggest, his financial ties to Russia are what’s causing a stir tonight. The New York Times and the BBC looked into this part of the story as part of global collaboration. Keith Boag has the details.

Trump: Wilbur mentioned a couple of words: reciprocal trade.

Boag: One thing that separates Wilbur Ross from the other billionaires that Donald Trump has at his cabinet table is that how far back in the President’s history he goes, and how important he was in making Trump what he is today.

David J. Johnston: If it hadn’t been for Wilbur Ross Trump would not be in the White House.

Boag: David J. Johnston has chronicled the ups and downs of Trump’s business career for three decades. Including his failure in Atlantic New Jersey, with the money losing Taj Mahal that almost sank Trump. Ross, Trained as a bankruptcy adviser, engineered a deal for Trump that kept him afloat by establishing that the Trump name had its own value as a brand.

David J. Johnston: Wilbur Ross was a key negotiator in Donald Trump not having to go through bankruptcy and not getting swept into the dustbin of history.

Boag: This year Ross became the United States Secretary of Commerce. He divested most of his business assets, but kept a stake in a shipping company called Navigator, where he was once chairman. One of Navigator’s biggest customers is Russia’s gas and petro-chemical company Sibur. mong Sibur’s owners, President Vladimir Putin’s son-in-law, and…

(Now introduction of the feature on the Bronfmans.)

Gillian Findlay: Well he is probably the Bronfman that no-one has ever heard of, Heather. He’s always kept a very low-profile as a businessman, a philanthropist, an environmentalist. But in 2013 he became a powerful player in Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party.

Trudeau: Pleasure to meet you.

Person in the crowd: Hi, Justin.

Trudeau: Hi!

Gillian Findlay: It was a summer caucus retreat in P.E.I. And for the first time in a long time Liberals were upbeat [cheery music in the background]. A new charismatic leader [cheers], A new hope for power.

Trudeau: Across the country people have told me that we need better. And for the first time in a long time, people are open and hopeful about the Liberal party of Canada.

Findlay: Among the assembled was a man not much use to the campaigning part of politics, but a man the party would now rely on to raise the money it takes to succeed. Trudeau and Bronfman chuckle] Stephen Bronfman had been named to the party’s national board.

Apparently the CBC was incessantly reporting on the redesign of The National all of Monday as if it a breaking story instead of all the incredible news still developing from yesterday. Even Sunday’s broadcast wasted 30 seconds hyping it. Tomorrow I’ll have fun deconstructing the stupid concepts of having four hosts and less stories. I’ll also have the letter to the ombudsman on how the CBC has still refused to report on the explosive, and very likely real, allegations that Hillary Clinton rigged the DNC nomination.

966da750-b13e-4175-b5f7-da06d7a37bfc

 

 

If you’re fed up with CBC’s bias please make sure to click on the link below and give Sunday’s program a thumbs down.

The National for Sunday, November 5, 2017

 

 

 

Still No Word on Hillary Clinton Scandal, But 20 Minutes for ‘Ask Bob’ on Climate Change in Friday’s ‘The National’ (November 3, 2017)

(What Was Wrong With CBC’s The National Mission Statement.)

Time allotment for The National stories on Friday:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRSAZR7wHATJsKER2RkeCmM7wMA62IMSErvNYcAEZ7wOviBNM5RXxznnU5jHeWGU-6cw6vvvw7a7I-H/pubchart?oid=1097049240&format=interactive

What was wrong with The National on Friday:

  • Well the CBC got to the Julie Payette story finally, albeit a couple days late. CBC’s Katie Simpson did give some people of faith to respond to Payette’s inappropriate comments from a Governor General and also included a Facebook comment from Andrew Scheer questioning why Trudeau praised Payette for her comments mocking religion. Unless the CBC couldn’t get a direct comment from Scheer in the past couple days, I find it interesting that Trudeau got a lengthy part of this segment to explain his thoughts on the matter but Scheer only gets a Facebook response included in the report. The report also didn’t make it clear how unprecedented Payette’s comments are for a Governor General, and didn’t show that the Liberals are promoting Payette’s divisive comments on Twitter.

c7fcedaf-04ca-4f46-b278-eef344993991.png

  • The next report proved The National can put together breaking news when it puts its mind to it. Environment Minister Catherine McKenna confronted a Rebel Media reporter out in B.C. for the controversial right-wing media outlet calling her Climate Barbie. Personally I think Rebel calling politicians names is completely juvenile, however I think they have a right to say it if they want to, but don’t expect to be taken seriously as a news organization then. I find it interesting that this event happened a few hours before The National aired and the flagship program was able to fit this in as its second report. Many other stories, like Payette’s, The National completely misses or reports days late. But this involved the infamous Rebel Media, which the Liberals and much of the media are using to try and smear Scheer because of his campaign manager’s involvement as an IT guy and one of the founders of the conservative outlet. (Full disclosure, I’ve written extensively on The Rebel’s antics over the past several months for Canadaland.) So of course the CBC seized on the opportunity to report on this story, but ignored the Rebel story from a year ago that was blowing up on social media again this week about McKenna’s department buying a brand new Tesla, old porsches, and other luxury cars for “emissions testing.” The National ‘s one-minute report only showed McKenna’s side of the exchange. The CBC should’ve included the part where the Rebel reporter asks McKenna to stop using the derogatory term “deniers” for anyone who is skeptical of climate change studies and models. (Again, I think it’s inappropriate for journalists to come up with cheap shot names for politicians, but as a columnist myself, columnists do give politicians the odd nickname, but when most people at your organization repeatedly call a politician climate barbie it’s no longer appropriate in my humble opinion, especially when that nickname will largely be interpreted, myself included, as misogynistic and sexist. If you don’t agree with McKenna then rally your ideas and research together and fight her ideas. Don’t attack her personally.)

  • The National then did a segment on the latest job numbers that wasn’t very critical of quality of jobs–or lack thereof–and the number of part-time jobs. Otherwise the report was pretty accurate in saying the supposedly hot market is likely already cooling off. But the report still mostly would leave the viewer with a rosy picture of the job market in Canada.
  • The next segment was an update on clearing up the confusion Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson started earlier this week by saying fewer than five cabinet ministers were exploiting the same ethics loophole Morneau used. It turned out it was just Morneau using it, which begs the question, why did Dawson’s office say that from the outset? The report then finished by saying Morneau is planning to put his assets in a blind trust. Guess that scandal is over in CBC’s eyes, despite the opposition still hammering Morneau over his decisions to mislead the public and not recuse himself from working on legislation that would affect the price of his shares in his family’s company. I think the CBC thinks the story is confusing enough that most Canadians don’t really care that an acting Finance Minister held over a million shares in an industry that he was actively regulating in the legislature. The fact that he misled the public and decided not to relinquish control of this asset just adds to the sketchiness of his actions. Somehow CBC’s The National doesn’t think so.
  • Then there was a quick report on the use of the new Magnitsky Act against international human rights abusers in Canada. Have to commend the Liberal government on this one. Deserved more than a 20-second report by The National though.

The National then had a report on how the opposition, provinces, police, and Senators are asking the Trudeau government to slow down legalizing pot. The report was pretty balanced, but again they found a way to insert a relatively long clip of Trudeau walking and smiling.

5aa0676a-c7c1-4d80-92a3-f2715d91f65f

  • The next story worth mentioning was the rise in acid attacks in London, England, that have made it the acid attack capital of the world. The CBC reporter failed to explain that the increased immigration from certain areas of the world, and the culture those newcomers bring with them, is major factor in the epidemic. Instead, the reporter said it’s coming from East London, as if that explains why. Of course CBC would never posit the idea that too much immigration to a Western country from certain regions can have negative effects for the large cities of these countries. That doesn’t mean I’m anti-immigration, but CBC’s complete pro-immigration stance–lockstep with the Liberals–is outrageous when many European countries are facing tremendous problems from open door immigration policies. Instead, UK politicians’ ridiculous solution is to ban commonplace corrosive substances from minors and make them harder to obtain. Perhaps a second look at immigration policies in the UK are in order.

4d13457c-a81d-4318-8bf2-df3a37163497

eef66cb0-7edf-4336-9551-93e2823aaa32.png

  • The National then had an Ask Bob climate change edition where viewers got to send in questions for CBC’s science correspondent Bob McDonald. Heather Hiscox started off the segment with a primer where she said, “Our knowledge of climate change is still imperfect. But it is a field scientists have been building on for decades.” Okay, fair enough, but just because they’ve been building on it doesn’t mean they have any idea to what extent global warming is influenced by humans. Hiscox in her interview with McDonald asked him if he knew from his decades of covering climate change, if he knew it was going to be the pressing issue of today. Sorry, but geopolitics and possible nuclear war are far more pressing, the jury is still out on global warming and there are new game-changing technology just around the bend that might solve the problem quite rapidly. This whipping up of fear among Western citizenry to convince them to shoot themselves economically in the foot over this questionable phenomenon, while letting the developing world pollute to its heart’s content in these international agreements may not be the best solution. Both Hiscox and McDonald kept referencing the UN and its studies as if that international body can be trusted to be impartial. To be fair, some of McDonald’s explanations were interesting, but saying, “The Earth can heal itself if we stop pushing it. And I really believe we can if we take it seriously and stop saying that there is a debate about this. There is no debate.” Well there could be if you have some voices from the other side that CBC and the government call deniers. There are many scientists out there that are skeptical about the doomsday picture McDonald and the Liberal government paint. Perhaps the CBC should present this other side instead of just giving McDonald 20 minutes–pretty much half of The National program–to lectures us on the subject from upon high on his pulpit. This incredibly long interview left no time I guess to report on the Hillary Clinton scandal over how she apparently rigged the DNC against her opponent Bernie Sanders. It’s bizarre that this hasn’t been reported by The National or CBC at all. Instead the most recent reports on her are about her book tour into Canada and supposedly debunking her and Bill’s connection to a uranium deal with Russia. My God is the pro-Clinton bias clear.

31e2fac7-0fc6-4635-8557-481d1159e1e1

  • The final report was on gentrification in LA. I guess The National forgot about our own domestic problems with gentrification and a housing market that seems to only go up in prices. Perhaps a story on how Chinese gangs in Vancouver are laundering millions of dollars through casinos there might be influencing the housing market there and elsewhere in Canada. But that would be controversial, so instead The National reports on gentrification outside our borders.

If you’re fed up with CBC’s The National‘s bias make sure to share this on Twitter and Facebook. Also click on the link below and give a down vote.

Friday’s The National

 

Explosive Reports Hillary Clinton Rigged Democrat Nomination Missing From CBC’s ‘The National’ Thursday (November 2, 2017)

(What Was Wrong With CBC’s The National Mission Statement.)

Time allotment for The National stories on Thursday:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRCXvwIEmm42c1CNoVtzM8pVxn9K7hPT7qLXWlgSsNNg-x5Yjc9FbrICaEqdEde2DoKwYtcRRe17N7T/pubchart?oid=331764434&format=interactive

What was wrong with CBC’s The National Thursday night:

  • The National led with the murder investigation in a rural B.C. area because the remains of one murdered person were identified. An important story, yes, because other women went missing in the area, so this may turn out to have been a serial killer. That being said, a more national news story may be the hundreds of millions being laundered through B.C. casinos. And on Thursday night, a story that didn’t even get reported by The National, the new Governor General Julie Payette’s political comments deriding the religions and those that are skeptical of climate change science was a more important and breaking news story. (When I criticize the placement of news stories like this murder, it should not be misinterpreted as belittling its importance or the sadness of the tragedy, merely that I’m arguing journalists have to make decisions on the newsworthiness of stories, and if you weigh this ongoing story with that of Payette’s unbecoming and unprecedented behviour of a GG then clearly the latter story is more important for the average Canadian, which The National should be catering to.)
  • The next story was on how 3 million Canadian home fire extinguishers have been recalled. An important story that was reported well.
  • Sacred First Nation’s land can be developed for a ski resort. The report was fairly balanced with people from both sides of the argument given time.
  • Then there was a nearly three-minute report on a government consultation into workplace harassment that gave Trudeau 20 seconds to voice his thoughts. The government consultation is anecdotal, so I don’t think the report should’ve been given so much prominence on The National because it isn’t scientific, but it does help with the government’s image as feminists.

Capture+_2017-11-03-01-13-28

  • The next report worth mentioning was on President Trump’s tweets calling for the death penalty for the NYC terrorist. The report was fair and warranted because Trump’s comments could poison the jury pool and make it difficult for a fair trail to be conducted. However, considering that on Thursday explosive news also broke of allegations from former Democratic National Committee chair Donna Brazile that Hillary Clinton rigged the Democrat nomination process against Bernie Sanders it is amazing that The National didn’t report on this at all. Clinton has long accused Trump of attacking the democratic process, yet here she is likely exposed as being even more guilty of this crime. It isn’t that surprising that The National didn’t cover this though, the Canadian elite have long been close with the Clintons, and much of the foreign money poured into the Clinton Foundation came from wealthy Canadians. Furthermore, like I’ve said before, CBC has always painted a picture of Democrats being from the good U.S. party and the Republicans as a party full of the evil and benighted. in reality there are plenty of villains from both parties. Another explosive story from this week is the continued drip, drip of news that Tony Podesta is next in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, which is beginning to reveal that top political aides on both dies of the aisle are influence peddling for Russia. Bet on The National continuing to frame this as only Trump and the Republians, until it’s impossible to ignore the other side to this story once new indictments happen.

  • The National had a feature report on how polar bears’ population is declining because of climate change. The piece had sad piano music to set the tone and implied that global warming is bad because polar bears’ numbers are declining. The problem with this continual unquestioning bias towards climate change coverage as it being all bad, no good, is a dishonest portrayal of the situation. There are benefits to the world warming, but you’d never know it from The National‘s portrayal of it as Armageddon. Of course at the end of the segment the host then promoted CBC’s own Bill Nye the Sicence Guy or Niel De Grasse Tyson, Bob McDonald. These science guys acting like high priests all-knowing about everything science the viewer should be wary. Since David Suzuki has lowered his profile after it turned out he’s a huge hypocrite because he has his own massive carbon footprint, CBC has appointed Bob McDonald as its science guru. McDonald and CBC will continue to assist the Liberal government’s unquestioning faith that climate change is going to cause the next apocalypse.
  • The National finally got to Jason Kenney’s historical win of the UCP leadership–just about a week late. The At Issue panel didn’t have anything too noteworthy to say about it though, other than that Kenney might overshadow federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer. Huffington Post’s Althia Raj could hardly suppress her disdain for right-wingers. The panel then moved on to the ongoing Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s scandal The National hasn’t bothered to cover half the time. Coyne cut through the spin and made it clear Morneau and Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson have a lot of questions to answer. Of course the Julie Payette controversy was swept under the rug.

If you’re fed up with the bias of CBC’s flagship news program make sure to click on the link below and click the thumb down.

Thursday’s The National

 

What Was Wrong With CBC’s ‘The National’ Wednesday Night (November 1, 2017)

(What Was Wrong With CBC’s The National Mission Statement.)

Time allotment for The National stories on Wednesday.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vQwroR6PjDupAA96hz5YSAm6nfJRnEiFozWTt94ppW2VGDJ8uZmkN9PR0gJjJSjn_o8O7RukWG4_Ynz/pubchart?oid=222109267&format=interactive

What was wrong with The National Wednesday night:

  • The lead story was the NYC terrorist attack again. A fair report but not sure it needed to be the lead story again.
  • The lead report segued into Trump’s response to the attack. The CBC didn’t like his “name-calling and finger pointing” of the terrorist and the diversity lottery immigration program. Then they rolled out the usual Democrat politicians so they could blast Trump’s response as divisive.
  • Then the CBC continued its long saga reporting almost every other day on the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Inquiry. More heartbreaking stories, but sadly nothing new from what has been seen over the past while from the bungled inquiry.
  • Oddly a report on the criminal investigation by the Competition Bureau involving raiding offices of Loblaw, Metro and George Weston left out all of their names and spent most of the report having experts say it’s likely nothing and that grocery stores have tight profit margins. Bizarre way to report the development, but like I say in my mission statement, CBC tends to go easy on the elite, an inevitability with state-funded media.

  • The National quickly reported on the Liberals plan to up immigration, including the Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen making the announcement. Was a quick report just going over the plan, but I’m sure in coming days CBC will cheer lead the decision.
  • The CBC then spent a whopping 15 minutes on an Indigenous reserve’s new housing developments and a new type of home. The National loves to spend a third of each episode on a long feature that probably loses the average viewer’s interest after a few minutes. I appreciate the importance of covering Indigenous peoples’ stories, but they seem to get an inordinate amount of the coverage on The National.
  • After the break the CBC had another feature on an indigenous story about a film that is entirely in a rare Indigenous language. Another snoozer for someone looking to get the news of the day.
  • The rest of the program was little unremarkable segments and then a longer segment on the chances of the Canadian Men’s Hockey team’s chances of winning at the Winter Olympics. The National will continue to promote its upcoming Olympic coverage clearly.
  • A top news story missing from The National‘s coverage? Toronto Sun columnist Tarek Fatah’s would-be assassin being arrested. Tarek’s daughter Natasha Fatah is one of CBC’s best reporters. (Yes, they have good people within the organization, the problem is the corporate climate putting pressure on CBC staff, which causes a PC echo chamber in its coverage of the news. The government funding also compromises the coverage.) It seems odd that those two features needed to run so long that no mention of the attempted assassination of a Canadian columnist didn’t make the nightly news.

If you’re fed up with CBC’s flagship program’s bias, please click on the link below and give a thumb down to show your dissatisfaction.

Wednesday’s The National

 

What Was Wrong With CBC’s ‘The National’ Tuesday (October 31, 2017)

(What Was Wrong With CBC’s The National Mission Statement.)

Time allotment for The National stories on Tuesday.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRaxyHUyreLaYz7SFKaST0i3UhHzypavIrJMMlW2-F-a0KZUtMHD_P_g2kFr40GPms_xkW-rqMvuj9p/pubchart?oid=67839267&format=interactive

What was wrong with The National Tuesday night:

  • The lead story on the New York terror attack was actually a good news report
  • The lead story was followed up with a former CSIS officer explaining terrorist attacks and giving background. Again, another fair report. (Have to give credit where credit is due.)
  • The follow-up reporting again failed to tie in top Hillary Clinton political operative Tony Podesta. Otherwise it wasn’t too biased.
  • A story on the possible cancellation of a hydro dam in B.C. took a few minutes of the broadcast, but still no report on the story of money laundering of hundreds of millions of dollars in B.C. casinos for some strange reason.
  • CBC spent almost eight minutes trying to hype up its Pyeongchang Olympic coverage.
  • The National then interviewed murdered Russian whistleblower Sergei Magnitsky’s family. The interview was good, albeit long (nine minutes). An important story though as Canada just passed a Magnitsky law against human rights abusers.
  • A nine-minute feature on crowdfunding money for the classroom seemed painfully boring so I skipped it.
  • CBC finally dropped the ball by having a 28-second report to give a rundown on all of the costumes worn by Dear leader’s family. In the two weeks I’ve been covering The National Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer has barely been on for more than a few seconds at Question Period and the new NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has been completely absent.
  • The ongoing scandal involving Finance Minister Bill Morneau at Parliament was again completely ignored, despite Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre dominating him in Question Period.

If CBC’s bias towards Trudeau and the Liberals bother you make sure to give The National‘s episodes a thumb down.

Tuesday’s The National.

What Was Wrong With CBC’s ‘The National’ Sunday Night (October 29, 2017)

Mission Statement for “What Was Wrong With The National”:

During the last federal election campaign, Justin Trudeau promised to give the CBC additional funding if he became PM. This clearly affected the CBC’s election coverage, where the so-called impartial public broadcaster actively promoted Trudeau as Harper’s replacement. After winning the election, Trudeau rewarded CBC for it’s assistance in the federal election by awarding the state broadcaster with an additional $675 million in early 2016 to be spread out until the end of 2021. This renewal of funding added to the annual $1.1 billion (it’s unclear if this is the true amount the CBC receives, some argue it’s closer to $1.5 billion) the federal government already gives the CBC courtesy of Canadian taxpayers. Trudeau’s gift to the CBC has been returned in kind. Who can forget Peter Mansbridge grossly fawning over Trudeau when he was sworn-in? Or when CBC did a special reality-TV-like special called “Face-to-Face with the PM” for Trudeau, which Hillary Clinton’s campaign wanted to emulate? Or when CBC let the PM do the opening monologue for it’s Canada 150 history special? But the CBC bias goes far beyond creating propaganda for Trudeau and the Liberals. The broadcaster is run by Canadian elites on both sides of the aisle, and for that reason, the broadcaster doesn’t have much teeth in going after high-profile Canadians abusing power in general, and usually ends up doing PR-style damage control for them instead. Exacerbating the situation is how CBC goes beyond its mandate of providing only what private broadcasters won’t, instead actively scavenging the Canadian media landscape, all with the unfair advantage of billions pouring in from Ottawa. To top it all off, with this massive financial advantage CBC is able to dominate the conversation and control the narrative in Canada. This needs to stop. That’s why I’ve begun deconstructing CBC’s flagship program, The National, which is emblematic of everything wrong with the CBC’s biased coverage. If you like what I’m doing, please make sure to share these posts on Facebook and Twitter. Eventually we’ll work on sending some polite but pointed letters to the CBC ombudsman for the most egregious coverage on The National, letting them know a large group of Canadians are not pleased with the so-called public broadcaster.

As always, the time allotment for stories on Sunday’s The National first.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vTxu6rxeb7vSAhZ4vbCNEM0Rfgi7dx1FYoSvKJXHVc0wqIqkS4oHYfG3dtuBRFiw54NIbl44uLLLBn3/pubchart?oid=363860416&format=interactive

CBC’s The National on Sunday was awestruck by The Amazing Kreskin gracing Ontario. The lead story for Sunday’s episode was about Bernie Sanders schmoozing Canadians, stroking our egos by telling us how great our health care system is. CBC loves this kind of story about social welfare being great, without ever questioning its drawbacks. Coincidentally, Josh Lieblein and I co-wrote a piece (which will hopefully be published any day now) last month on the benefits of the American private system compared to our socialist system that Bernie Sanders and his sidekick Dr. Danielle Martin constantly laud. It turns out Toronto Sun columnist Candice Malcolm beat us to the punch though, writing a piece for National Review back in April, which she brought to my attention yesterday on Twitter after Sanders claimed Canadians have a health care system that is apparently the envy of the world. (Don’t get me wrong, I’m grateful for our system and how it mostly works for those most in need, but let’s not act holier than thou towards Americans or assume our system would work as well in the U.S.)

Sadly, however, Canada’s health care system is falling behind the pack of socialized health care systems of the Western world.

Of course, none of the above stole any thunder from The National‘s mostly undeserved self-congratulatory lead report.

Host Susan Ormiston: Ask Canadians what differentiates this country from the U.S. and inevitably the conversation turns to health care. This weekend former U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was in Canada touring hospitals, asking questions, and today talking about our system to a packed house.

(Except it wasn’t a packed house.)

Lorenda Reddekopp: Bernie Sanders is still a hot ticket on campus. Popular with this crowd in Toronto, just as he was with U.S. students during his presidential run.

Sanders: Real change always happens from the bottom on up.

Reddekopp: He calls this visit a fact-finding mission to learn more about Canada’s health system. He toured three different hospitals, meeting patients fully covered by medicare, including one recovering from heart surgery.

Sanders: The issue that has got to be studied is how does it happen that here in Canada they provide quality health care to all people. And I don’t think there is any debate that they quality of care is as good or better than in the States.

(Tell that to the roughly 63,000 Canadians that headed down South last year to get treated.)

Sanders: And they do it for half the cost.

(Again, the U.S. subsidizes medical innovations for the rest of the world through its free market system. I have two family members in pharmaceuticals and they both cite America as the main driver for R&D because that is where drug companies will get rewarded for taking the incredible risk of pouring millions into such risky gambles. The rest of the Western world regulates drug prices so that companies cannot reap the profits, if America did this as well, drug innovation would likely grind to a halt. Furthermore, I’m curious what statistics Sanders is citing, and whether or not those numbers factor in the many Canadians spending their own money to get treated in the U.S., which would undoubtedly artificially lower the cost burden on the Canadian system.)

Reddekopp: Dr. Danielle Martin played tour guide for the senator and his team. She’s a found of Canadian Doctors for Medicare and a fierce proponent of public health care. Her back-and-forth with a U.S. senator in 2014 went viral, [replayed the video].

(Josh and I will be addressing some of Dr. Martin’s assertions in our soon-to-be-published piece.)

Reddekopp: Martin acknowledges the system has its flaws. Bernie Sanders wants to address some of them for his health care plan in the U.S. It includes free prescriptions, dental and eye care. Sanders ideas resonate with this audience. Premiere Kathleen Wynne introduced him. Her government is bringing in prescription drug coverage for everyone under 25.

Wynne: The senator encourages us to think bold. He pushes us to think about bold steps that we can take to build the kind of world that we want to live in.

Reddekopp: New federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh was also there. Like Sanders he’ll also be pushing for prescription drugs to be fully funded by the government.

(Again, the CBC reports all of this as if it’s unquestionably a good thing and somehow affordable in a province in Ontario that is the most indebted sub-sovereign nation in North America. This is the fourth positive story for Wynne in the last week, despite the recent news from the Ontario Auditor General releasing a scathing report recently about the OLP blowing billions in additional interest payments in order to keep the Fair Hydro Plan off the so-called balanced budget. Going by CBC’s coverage, you’d never know how unprecedentedly unpopular the premier is in her own province, except for the brief mention of her being the least popular premier in the report on the Sudbury bribery trial being thrown out, which largely suggested Wynne is on the comeback trail and failed to mention the still ongoing mass email deletion trial involving two other Liberal operatives. I’m starting to get the distinct impression The National has a pro-Wynne bias. Ditto that for Rachel Notley.)

Reddekopp: But sometimes across the border the Canadian system is sometimes mocked.

Mike Pence: We don’t want the socialized health care they have in Canada. We want American solutions.

Donald Trump [back in a presidential debate agaisnt Hillary Clinton]: Did you ever notice the Canadians–when they need a big operation, when something happens–they come to the United States in many cases because their system is so slow, it’s catastrophic in certain ways.

(There’s actually a lot of truth to that, but the CBC viewer is supposed to infer that these two evil Republicans don’t know what the hell they’re talking about. A recurring theme in CBC coverage is Republicans are villainous and Democrats are do-gooders. It’s a pathetically simple-minded worldview.)

Reddekopp: President Trump got elected on a platform to get rid of what little medicare there is in the U.S. And that’s still the goal for his administration. So for all of Bernie Sanders’ popularity here in Toronto this weekend, his dream of fully-funded health care still seems unlikely in today’s political reality.

Well, Reddekopp either just completely lied or misstated Trump’s campaign promises to not cut American medicare, which is largely coverage for seniors in the U.S., and also his promise to repeal and replace Obamacare with another universal health care system for all. He was the only Republican candidate to run on this, but most CBC reporters have an overly-simplistic view of Trump and Republicans and the American health care system that they just assume Trump is against universal health care coverage. This last bit of reporting was embarrassingly wrong.

The CBC then did another segment talking about Sanders taking constituents up to Canada to buy cheaper drugs here, completely missing the fact that those drugs creation had been subsidized by the American free market system, and would likely not exist otherwise. At least Ormiston finished this second report by admitting drug costs in Canada have “since risen to some of the highest in the world.”

Then the CBC moved on to one of its favourite stories, the ongoing opioid crisis. I know this is an important story, but there really isn’t any new development so it isn’t really news at this point. But again, the CBC likes to report on the dead more than the living because you don’t have to speak ill of the dead.

The National then did a report on the upcoming Robert Mueller charges in the Russian investigation, suggesting many Americans wouldn’t believe the charges because President Trump is dismissing them. However, the report failed to show that their are legitimate concerns about the Mueller’s connections to the Democrats and how previous investigations of Hillary Clinton and others were considered to have let her off the hook. Many investigations in U.S. are indeed partisan by nature. That’s not to say Americans shouldn’t necessarily take Mueller’s charges seriously, but the context of why Americans are wary of the special prosecutor and his perhaps selective targets is completely missing in CBC’s coverage. This report finally mentioned Hillary’s campaign paying for the phony dossier and her connection to the sale of uranium to Russia, but only in passing and as if to say they’re spurious accusations from Republicans trying to change the channel. It’s highly unlikely the CBC will dig into the dirt of the Democrats.

The next story worth mentioning was David Cochrane’s spinning of former prime minister Stephen Harper’s leaked memo blasting the Liberals handling of NAFTA. Somehow the thrust of the story became how this puts Conservative leader Andrew Scheer in a tough spot politically, instead of taking any look at what Harper’s specific criticisms of the Liberals’ NAFTA negotiating tactics. Instead they let Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland sole characterization of the memo as “capitulation”.

Jason Kenney’s monumental feat of winning the leadership of the UCP in Alberta only got a passing reference when The National mentioned he wants to run in a byelection. Kenney was able to win the leadership contest of the former Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta, then merge the two conservative parties in Alberta, then win another leadership contest, but all The National gives the culmination of these politically historic moments in a resurgence of Canadian conservatism is a 25-second report on how Kenney wants to run in a byelection as soon as possible. Are you kidding me? Kenney’s win should’ve been top Canadian news. Instead it was buried midway through the show, and a socialist American politician showing up here somehow is the top story. The National devoted way more time on the anniversary of Premier Rachel Notley’s father dying in a plane crash just last week.

CBC’s The National then spent over ten minutes on both the opioid crisis, again, and Turkey devolving into a theocratic dictatorship. After that there was a two-and-a-half-minute report on Nunavut’s upcoming election. I’m pretty sure there were more voters in the UCP vote than the 35,944 citizens living in all of Nunavut, but of course never underestimate CBC’s ability to highlight the less relevant and completely overlook the relevant in its reporting to what matters to the average Canadian.

The National then did a recap of Sanders visit to close out the program. Basically CBC sees American socialists as good, so give them lots of coverage, but Canadian conservatives are bad, so only give them passing mention. CBC News even published on YouTube Bernie Sanders giving a 33-minute speech about “what the U.S. can learn from Canadian health care.”

If you’re sick of the CBC’s general biases and don’t feel the so-called public broadcaster is covering the stories that matter to everyday Canadians, make sure you click on the link below and give a thumb down. This week I’m also going to write the first letter of complaint to the CBC ombudsman for readers to jointly send.

The National (October 30, 2017)

What Was Wrong With CBC’s ‘The National’ Thursday and Friday Night (October 26 & 27)

Mission Statement for “What Was Wrong With The National”:

During the last federal election campaign, Justin Trudeau promised to give the CBC additional funding if he became PM. This clearly affected the CBC’s election coverage, where the so-called impartial public broadcaster actively promoted Trudeau as Harper’s replacement. After winning the election, Trudeau rewarded CBC for it’s assistance in the federal election by awarding the state broadcaster with an additional $675 million in early 2016 to be spread out until the end of 2021. This renewal of funding added to the annual $1.1 billion (it’s unclear if this is the true amount the CBC receives, some argue it’s closer to $1.5 billion) the federal government already gives the CBC courtesy of Canadian taxpayers. Trudeau’s gift to the CBC has been returned in kind. Who can forget Peter Mansbridge grossly fawning over Trudeau when he was sworn-in? Or when CBC did a special reality-TV-like special called “Face-to-Face with the PM” for Trudeau, which Hillary Clinton’s campaign wanted to emulate? Or when CBC let the PM do the opening monologue for it’s Canada 150 history special? But the CBC bias goes far beyond creating propaganda for Trudeau and the Liberals. The broadcaster is run by Canadian elites on both sides of the aisle, and for that reason, the broadcaster doesn’t have much teeth in going after high-profile Canadians abusing power in general, and usually ends up doing PR-style damage control for them instead. Exacerbating the situation is how CBC goes beyond its mandate of providing only what private broadcasters won’t, instead actively scavenging the Canadian media landscape, all with the unfair advantage of billions pouring in from Ottawa. To top it all off, with this massive financial advantage CBC is able to dominate the conversation and control the narrative in Canada. This needs to stop. That’s why I’ve begun deconstructing CBC’s flagship program, The National, which is emblematic of everything wrong with the CBC’s biased coverage. If you like what I’m doing, please make sure to share these posts on Facebook and Twitter. Eventually we’ll work on sending some polite but pointed letters to the CBC ombudsman for the most egregious coverage on The National, letting them know a large group of Canadians are not pleased with the so-called public broadcaster.

It turns out that The National revamp will be unveiled on November 6. The plan is to apparently have a day long program with four co-hosts: Adrienne Arsenault, Rosemary Barton, Andrew Chang and Ian Hanomansing. There’s no way in hell I’m going to subject myself to hours and hours of the CBC each day, lest I start believing their leftist agenda and Liberal government talking points.

At least there will still be a late evening show I can catch and quarter. I wonder how much money and resources the CBC will pour into the shows new sets and show graphics.

Anyhow, moving on to the last couple episodes of The National. First off, here are the time allotments for stories for the last two episodes.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vQlcU2PBa04gcVblrQQ0HlbUYJfMVCl0czCdvyU_ZLVo1u_1CX-Hh8r3UMW6mRnZHog3hrM8hN_2Zfp/pubchart?oid=121432095&format=interactive

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vR1ys03dNf_VyL7z6lDH-qV_GQpKRn0MHOfKlARcaw5gTkd_N5qi305Hou9hSQ6rKqbI-ryRUUJqmZE/pubchart?oid=1158740773&format=interactive

Well, The National actually led with the top story on Thursday night. Susan Ormiston opened the show introducing the latest developments to Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s recent scandal.

Ormiston: A week ago in the thick of a controversy involving his personal finances and shares in his family’s company, Bill Morneau said he needed to do more to make sure Canadians had confidence in him. He has already agreed to put his assets in a blind trust and sell off his shares in Morneau Shepell.

(The CBC’s The National has never really given the context of how Morneau led the media to believe a blind trust had been set up two years when he assumed political office as Finance Minister.)

Ormiston: Today the Finance Minister took another step aimed at stamping out a political firestorm but his critics say it did the opposite. David Cochrane has our story tonight.

Cochrane: This controversy has already been politically expensive for Bill Morneau, now it is personally expensive.

(Cochrane fails to ask the obvious follow-up questions in his report: What kind of tax break will Morneau get from his donation? If you did nothing wrong why why do you feel the need to do this? How many shares did your family members also have in Morneau Shepell? You say you now have a million shares in Morneau Shepell, when did you sell the other half?)

Morneau [in the House of Commons]: I’ve decided to sell not only mine and my family’s assets in the company I built with my father for 25 years, but also decided to donate in difference of value in those shares from the time I was elected until now.

Cochrane: Those few words add up to big money. When he became Finance Minister Morneau Shepell stock traded at $15.58 a share. Today it closed at $21.08 a share. That’s a gain of $5.50 a share times one million shares, which means Morneau will donate as much as $5.5 million to charity to make this go away.

(Again, I’m not sure why Cochrane isn’t questioning the tax break Morneau will get over making such a large donation, which would likely mean Morneau will still benefit financially from holding such a large position in his family company while being in charge of regulating the industry that company is in.)

Morneau [in press scrum]: We made the decision that the most important thing for me is to continue to work on behalf of Canadians. I’m not sure what that value is and of course it’s not sure until it happens.

Cochrane [part of press scrum]: We’re talking about millions of dollars.

Morneau: Whatever that value is, that’s our decision. We’ve decided to make that donation.

Conservative MP Gerard Deltell: He acted only when in the corner. And it was a real profitable, personal conflict of interest for him and his family.

NDP MP Nathan Cullen: I think what we saw today was an admission of guilt. From my experience people don’t usually pay a fine or a fee if they’re innocent from something.

Cochrane: Rather than letting it drop, the opposition said this is just proof of wrongdoing, and they say there is even more out there. Cullen has asked the Ethics Commissioner to investigate Morneau’s role in drafting pension reform legislation known as C-27. Legislation his critics say will mean big money for Morneau Shepell. Today the Ethics Commissioner wrote Cullen to say she will look into it. ‘…your letter leaves me with concerns in relation to Mr. Morneau’s involvement with Bill C-27. Consequently, I will follow up with Mr. Morneau.’ So Morneau will go under the microscope of the Ethics Commissioner though it isn’t at the level of a formal investigation. His office has said that he will cooperate fully with the commissioner and answer any questions that she has. David Cochrane, CBC News, Ottawa.

Cochrane’s report also failed to mention that the commissioner has no teeth–giving Morneau a pathetic $200 fine for not disclosing his villa in Fance–and is usually appointed by the PM, but in Trudeau’s case Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson’s replacement will be chosen by his friends, Trudeau’s communications director Kate Purchase and his Government House Leader Bardish Chagger. Trudeau had to recuse himself from the appointment process because of the hilariously ironic fact that he is currently being investigated by Dawson over his clear breach of the Conflict-of-Interest Act when he decided to vacation at the billionaire Aga Khan’s private island, all while Khan’s charity is lobbying the government.Thankfully for him and Morneau, however, the most Dawson can do is slap them with fines worth less than the average speeding ticket.

That same Thursday night, Morneau continued to show his unapologetic arrogance when he appeared on CTV News for a train-wreck interview where he remained adamant he’d done nothing wrong.

Somehow I don’t think we’ll be seeing that on Friday’s The National.

The next story was on Trudeau’s government giving $31 million in settlements to Canadians wrongfully accused of terrorism. Of course the story led with the PM, Minister Ralph Goodale and a human rights lawyer all defending the settlement. Even the Conservattive MP didn’t argue they were entitled to money because of their innocence, but no-one questioning the amounts given to the three men in the settlement was presented in the report.

Midway through Thursday’s program Ormiston said before taking a break, “Just ahead, At Issue with their take on the conflict-of-interest controversy that continues to dodge (sic) the Finance Minister.”

(CBC’s The National has been helping the Finance Minister dodge accountability in his conflict-of-interest scandal that should be rightfully dogging Bill Morneau.)

I won’t bore you with the details of the panel discussion, but right from the get-go the National Post‘s Andrew Coyne laid out how Morneau is still in a lot of trouble politically. Huffington Post’s Ottawa bureau chief then added to the pile-on over how Morneau’s story on whether or not he recused himself from working on pension legislation keeps changing. Then Angus Reid Institute’s Shachi Kurl then joined in pointing out how Morneau has “alienated” himself from the small business community and everyday Canadians. Overall the panel was much more honest and accurate than Cochrane’s reporting over the past week. And I understand Cochrane is suppposed to do an objective news report, but his leaving out of the details that make Morneau look bad is unacceptable, and The National barely reporting on the scandal as it developed was also unacceptable.

Anyway, moving on to Friday’s The National. Noe of the reports from that day were really noteworthy enough to report on, and didn’t really have much to do with CBC bias. However, the rerun report on asylum seekers illegally entering Canada was pretty telling. At one point Ormiston spoke with an American border guard.

Ormiston: And so do you think that the messaging was that Canada was open to this?

American Border Guard: I think that’s what the Premier said right up front, didn’t he? The Prime Minister said that right up front, right [eyebrows raised]? So I think people took that literally.

Yeah, no shit. I’ve heard from several Canadians who have travelled abroad in the developing world that many people they met on their travels mentioned their intentions to want to come to Canada because of Trudeau’s careless words. It amazes me how the CBC and most of the media has forgotten or chosen to ignore that Trudeau tweeted to the world that Canada would welcome anyone to Canada. Why would a 12-minute report leave out Trudeau’s tweets, which encouraged these migrants to jump the immigration queue illegally? Perhaps it’s because the majority of Canadians are against it. Like I said, I wrote a CBC opinion piece warning about Trudeau’s ill-advised virtue-signalling tweets that resonated with many Canadians and was very popular online. It’s frustrating that the media tends to only cover the humanitarian side of this story. There are many criminals entering Canada as well, and it is promoting a black market for human trafficking and people flying to America simply to then illegally enter Canada.

Once again the Finance Minister’s story was no where to be found on Friday, despite Morneau’s arrogant refusal to admit he’d done anything wrong the night before. The National has also done zero reporting on the latest investigations started in relation to Hillary Clinton, or the Canadian connection in the sale of uranium to Russia that has also been developing over the past several days. Don’t hold your breath.

If you’re unhappy with CBC’s The National coverage click on the YouTube links below and give them both a thumb down.

The National (October 26, 2017)

The National (October 27, 2017)

What Was Wrong With CBC’s ‘The National’ Tuesday and Wednesday Night (October 24 & 25, 2017)

Mission Statement for “What Was Wrong With The National”:

During the last federal election campaign, Justin Trudeau promised to give the CBC additional funding if he became PM. This clearly affected the CBC’s election coverage, where the so-called impartial public broadcaster actively promoted Trudeau as Harper’s replacement. After winning the election, Trudeau rewarded CBC for it’s assistance in the federal election by awarding the state broadcaster with an additional $675 million in early 2016 to be spread out until the end of 2021. This renewal of funding added to the annual $1.1 billion (it’s unclear if this is the true amount the CBC receives, some argue it’s closer to $1.5 billion) the federal government already gives the CBC courtesy of Canadian taxpayers. Trudeau’s gift to the CBC has been returned in kind. Who can forget Peter Mansbridge grossly fawning over Trudeau when he was sworn-in? Or when CBC did a special reality-TV-like special called “Face-to-Face with the PM” for Trudeau, which Hillary Clinton’s campaign wanted to emulate? Or when CBC let the PM do the opening monologue for it’s Canada 150 history special? But the CBC bias goes far beyond creating propaganda for Trudeau and the Liberals. The broadcaster is run by Canadian elites on both sides of the aisle, and for that reason, the broadcaster doesn’t have much teeth in going after high-profile Canadians abusing power in general, and usually ends up doing PR-style damage control for them instead. Exacerbating the situation is how CBC goes beyond its mandate of providing only what private broadcasters won’t, instead actively scavenging the Canadian media landscape, all with the unfair advantage of billions pouring in from Ottawa. To top it all off, with this massive financial advantage CBC is able to dominate the conversation and control the narrative in Canada. This needs to stop. That’s why I’ve begun deconstructing CBC’s flagship program, The National, which is emblematic of everything wrong with the CBC’s biased coverage. If you like what I’m doing, please make sure to share these posts on Facebook and Twitter. Eventually we’ll work on sending some polite but pointed letters to the CBC ombudsman for the most egregious coverage on The National, letting them know a large group of Canadians are not pleased with the so-called public broadcaster.

Here’s another double-header deconstruction of CBC’s The National‘s coverage on Tuesday and Wednesday’s episodes.

First, here is the time allotment for stories on those two nights.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vSjavDVipNzCEBX1vfIfJ1Plw4V8Pbbi2hCsFhHcZ17O7sITvBAKHTAd1OzFTmbjSbXBJ21BsXy-p-H/pubchart?oid=597163971&format=interactive

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vQkP51Fs-T1XXo0LRrVcLf4S9vkJVLpNBh8B4uHE7Nhsye19Xu4jtoVRft_OeKY1JGzyihpA52arvHX/pubchart?oid=420950170&format=interactive

Before I begin, I’d first like to highlight what coverage has been most fascinating from my critiquing of The National thus far. It amazes me how little coverage has been given to Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s scandalous conflicts of interest that have been pouring out in the last week. The media had been left under the impression for years that Morneau had put his vast fortune in a blind trust when he became Finance Minister. He suggested as much in a CBC interview back in 2015 and also led employees at his family company Morneau Shepell into believing the same thing. But then it turned out he still owned millions of shares, using an ethics loophole to avoid putting his assets into a blind trust. This revelation was especially ironic because Morneau is in the middle of cracking down on small businesses for so-called “tax loopholes”, yet the loopholes for the extravagantly wealthy like himself and the PM are being left untouched and being taken advantage of in full. On top of this, it turns out that Morneau has most likely worked on pension legislation that positively affected his shares in his family business, pension company Morneau Shepell. Adding to this absurd conflicts of interest, Morneau’s proposed tax changes would also likely benefit Morneau Shepell and his millions of shares. And it doesn’t end there, Morneau Shepell also has many contracts with the government. And then there is the tone-deaf response from Morneau to the feeding frenzy over these egregious conflicts of interest. He’s tried to pretend like everything was above board and told reporters off. Yet, as you’ll see by The National‘s coverage, there is no appetite by these so-called journalists in an extremely newsworthy story. Instead, it’s an “unusual scandal” or “stir” because he followed the letter of the law. (I’ll address the latest developments from Thursday, including Morneau announcing he’ll donate the profits from his shares to charity and his inability to admit he did anything wrong in the next post.)

With all that in mind, let’s see what was wrong with CBC’s The National‘s coverage Tuesday night:

  • The opening of the show led with Quebec’s face-covering law yet again, only showing one side of the debate.
  • CBC continues to do damage control for the Finance Minister by leading with Morneau’s fall fiscal update. Mesley said at the beginning of the program, “The government announces a windfall and parents of young children will benefit.” It’s not really a windfall if you have added revenue coming in but are still spending billions more than you take in overall.
  • The story on two Ontario Liberals being acquitted on charges of bribery portrayed Wynne as being exonerated and a “huge weight” lifted off her back. The story made it appear as if the bribery trial is a main reason why she is historically unpopular (the report mentioned she’s the most unpopular premier in Canada, not her record low approval ratings). The report also trumpeted Wynne’s new minimum wage and other social welfare spending, spending the province can’t really afford.
  • The CBC’s deeper look into the context of Quebec’s face-covering law apparently is “prompting accusations of racism outside Quebec.” Whenever the CBC believes in something if just says what it believes as if it’s generally thought by everyone. Also, not sure how this is a racist bill. If someone cannot be idetntified by public officials that’s a problem, it has nothing do with one’s race. Mesley would then repeat the charge, saying many people are saying this is racist.
  • The CBC decided to do a feature on hospice patients in their last days of life that lasted a whopping 17 minutes and 45 seconds. It’s inexplicable why this is news, but remember, the CBC likes stories about the dead and the dying, you don’t speak ill of them.

Finally, CBC’s coverage of Finance Minister Bill Morneau is worth going over in detail. The fall fiscal update started off with Mesley saying, “…and to some, it’s a crowd-pleaser. As we first reported last night, the Finance Minister announced a boost to the Canada Child Benefit, as well as help for the working poor and shrinking federal deficits. All thanks to a windfall in unexpected growth. David Cochrane has the details from Ottawa.”

[Scene change to Morneau receiving roaring applause from his fellow Liberal MPs in the House of Commons]

Cochrane: The Finance Minister hasn’t had a day like this in a while. A chance to talk about the country’s finances instead of his own.

Morneau: I came to office knowing growing the middle class is how we grow the economy. Today, we’re doubling down on that strategy becuase it’s a strategy that’s working.

Cochrane: Morneau announced billions in new spending to enrich old programs. Pumping up Canada CHild Benefit checks that parents get every month by indexing them to the cost of living. He also boosted a tax benefit to help low-income workers.

Morneau: When Canadians succeed, they grow our economy, they create jobs, and together we build a better future.

[Scene changes to cute kid playing with a pumpkin]

(I’m starting to see why Cochrane is the PMO’s (Prime Minister’s Office) favourite parrot to give government “leaks”. The deficits better be shrinking, they’re already three-times what they were supposed to be, and reducing from those high levels is no feat worth mentioning. As for the supposed windfall, that is largely because the government is stimulating the economy by pouring billions into it while racking up debt. Another thing not to be proud of.)

Cochrane: Morneau argues that programs like the Child Benefit are driving economic growth by putting money in the hands of people who need it and will spend it. As proof, he says, growth and jobs are up while the deficit is down by more than $8 billion, but it’s not gone.

(Why not say how much it’s at still, Cochrane?)

Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre: There’s literally not a single year into the distant future when this government–ever–projects eliminating the deficit.

Cochrane: Morneau is projecting that the federal deficit will shrink, but it never gets to zero.

(Finally a graph shows this year’s $19.9 billion deficit.)

Cochrane: Instead he is planning to borrow money for the new spending.

Former Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page: Where’s the risk? I think the risk that inflation will be higher, the risk that interest rates will be higher. You know and the risk the government will be able to control program spending growth.

(Finally, some belated truth.)

NDP MP Guy Caron: So it’s obviously a way for the Liberal government to deflect attention away from the problems the minister is experiencing right now.

Cochrane: Today may not deflect from the problems Morneau has had over how he’s handled his personal fortune, but tomorrow he is set to meet with the Ethics Commissioner and seek advice on how to sell his assets and setup his blind trust and trying to put all of this behind him. David Cochrane, CBC News, Ottawa.

Wendy Mesley [back in studio]: Today’s update was a chance for Bill Morneau to change the channel. The Finance Minister has been at the center of a conflict-of-interest controversy. Chris Hall joins me now. So these updates–they’re always political–but this one in particular, tell us about that.

Hall: Well that’s right. The Liberals have really been off message in recent weeks. Whether it was Morneau’s continued ownership of millions of shares in his family company or a plan to tax employee discounts, they were looking anything but like a party of the middle class.

(So CBC just assumes because Trudeau says it endlessly that the Liberals are actually a party of the middle class?)

Hall: And that was the political imperative of today. To remind middle class voters that the Liberals are still on their side. To credit some of the measures, like the Canada Child Benefit and the Working Income Benefit for the great growth in the economy in the past two years. And that was the entire purpose here, to try and remind those middle class voters that they will be better off, that they can look into their pockets and see more money. And they’re betting that they’re more concerned about that then, for example, the size of the deficit.

(Reiterating the Liberals’ talking points just like Cochrane did.)

Mesley: So, will the tactic work?

(Looks like it, already working on you guys. Although you’re complicit in changing the channel.)

Hall: Well it’s an interesting question. It didn’t work in Question Period. The opposition was still asking Bill Morneau about his perceived conflict of interest.

(“Perceived,” right. Because the Finance Minister not recusing himself from working on pension legislation while still holding on to millions of shares in Morneau Shepell, all while convincing the media he’d put his assets into a blind trust, was not a conflict of interest at all.)

Hall: And there are a lot of risks here with this political reward that they are trying to get. first is, the NAFTA talks are not going well, so economic growth is not guaranteed in the future. And there’s also the concern with consumer debt at almost historic highs there is not a lot of wiggle room for Bill Morneau to have here if it doesn’t go as he plans. Again, the betting, though, politically, is that out there in the real world where Canadians are far more concerned about their own economic well-being and far less concerned with any appearance of conflict of interest here in Ottawa.

Pfffffft. CBC couldn’t stop talking over Mike Duffy for over a year, over $90,000 in phony housing allowances claimed. But now when a sitting Finance makes millions off of decisions he makes as a legislator through his private assets is just an appearance of conflict of interest. Just like Cochrane would probably deny any appearance of conflict of interest between him and the PMO (Prime Minister’s Office) in him getting the leaks first.

Now, moving on to Wednesday’s episode.

  • CBC led with new census numbers released that day. The main story from the census was the increase in people identifying as aboriginal. “A growth spurt that is largely due to growing pride,” claimed Susan Ormiston. I don’t know how she came up with that theory, but as the following report pointed out, the Indigenous community in Canada has a much higher birth rate and more people decided to claim Indian status. The latter reason may be more out of self-interest in getting the benefits of Indian status, like government settlements and tax exemption, than necessarily out of pride. But CBC won’t let that get in the way of their own unfounded narrative.

The only other story worth mentioning is the long feature on the Russian Magnitsky story. This was actually a fascinating feature, and I highly recommend readers watch it. However, this story is old news, and it is very strange, but also telling, that The National has made no mention of new stories about how Hillary and Bill Clinton are linked to a Russian uranium deal involving Canadian mining companies, as well as friend and Clinton Foundation partner Canadian Billionaire Frank Giustra. The Clintons have long been beneficiaries of millions from Canada’s corporate elite, so perhaps that’s why the latest two investigations opened by House Republicans got no coverage by The National. And there was also the bombshell story from the Washington Post revealing Hillary Clinton’s campaign paid for the fake Russian dossier on Trump that led to the FBI investigating his campaign during the election, suggesting possible collusion between Clinton, Obama, the FBI and Russia. Better to report on the murdered than the possibly corrupt living, unless it’s President Trump that is. Don’t get me wrong, by all means report on the antics of Trump, but this turning a blind eye by CBC’s The National to Democrats’ corruption is mind-boggling.

If you’re bothered by The National‘s coverage, please click on the links below and give them both a thumb down.

The National (October 24,2017)

The National (October 25, 2017)